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Author Topic: Sebaceous Hyperplasia  (Read 23504 times)

SarahVaughter

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Sebaceous Hyperplasia
« on: December 29, 2011, 12:31:25 PM »
> I have been diagnosed with Sebaceous Hyperplasia, which is in spots on

  > my face and nose. I wondered if you or your clients have had

  > experience with this problem, and whether you think a dermaroller or

  > single needling might help me.

  >

  > Thank you for any information you can provide.

  >

  > I just started reading your forum but haven't found anything on this

  > topic yet.

  >

  >

  >

  > My plan was to use some copper peptides on the problem areas, but I

  > thought needling might help, after reading so much on dermaroller and

  > the single needling.

 

Sebaceous Hyperplasia is the harmless enlargement of sebaceous glands. The glands are hormonally controlled and produce an oily sebum that lubricates the skin. If you got them during or after pregnancy, they will likely disappear by themselves as soon as the hormonal levels go back to normal.

   

  I doubt dermarolling could make the glands smaller. It could perhaps help normalize the skin physiology just like dermarolling often helps skin that is prone to acne. Yet, I do not think dermarolling will really help in case of Sebaceous Hyperplasia.

   

  In acne, sebaceous glands greatly overproduce sebum and this overproduction clogs skin pores, which causes acne (there is still very much unknown about acne but sebum overproduction is a main factor for acne formation).

  Dermarolling speeds up the turnover of the skin and that helps unclog pores and often improves acne-prone skin.

   

  In Sebaceous Hyperplasia, the sebum-producing gland is enlarged but it doesn't produce excessive amounts of sebum and that is why I doubt dermarolling could affect the size of the gland and improve this cosmetic condition.

   

  Sebaceous Hyperplasia nodules are treated just like warts or skin moles.

  They are mechanically removed by laser evaporization, liquid nitrogen, cauterization, acid peels or they are shaven off etc.

   

  If you intensively single needle the Sebaceous Hyperplasia nodule, the subsequent peeling may make it smaller but I am just hypothesizing.

   

  I am sorry I can't give you a totally clear-cut answer but dermarolling is a new method and there are dozens of skin conditions where the benefits of dermarolling have yet to be established.

   

  I have not heard from our customers about experience with this.

  I think you will be better off with mechanical removal.

michaeldallas

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Sebaceous Hyperplasia
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2012, 11:35:51 AM »
I found single needling quite effective in getting rid of sebaceous hyperplasias.  I had about thirty on my face.  As you can see from the pictures below, the results are dramatic. As you describe above, I "intensively needled" each hyperplasia - kind of like tattooing.  My strategy was to puncture the gland enough so that it died.  Research on the Internet indicated that the sebaceous glands are relatively shallow - .5m to 1m. The only small needle I could find were sugar testing lancets at the local drug store.  Here's the procedure I used:

1) alcohol the skin and the lancets, wash hands, etc.

2) lightly prick the hyperplasias over and over. I gradually increased the force until I could reliably prick the right depth.

3) I would use cotton pads soaked in alcohol to mash the lesions and empty the contents.

4) I later noticed that some of the hyperplasias were still "hard" - felt like a bump - to my finger.  So I changed technique.  Since I pricked with my right hand. I put a greasy antibiotic ointment on the index finger of my left hand.  I would then prick until I was satisfied.  I would then mash the hyperplasia with my ointment covered finger.  I would repeat the procedure until each lesion felt smooth with the skin and didn't have a hard lumpy feeling to it.

5) As the lesions healed, I would mash them with an ointment covered finger twice per day to make sure they were not filling with oil again and were healing smooth.

I have included pictures below.  It has only been 9 days so I cannot tell you you if they will return.  Also, I have significantly improved my skin care routine.  In fact, I've never had a skin care routine which probably is why I got these in the first place.



                      Attached files      

SarahVaughter

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Sebaceous Hyperplasia
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2012, 05:40:10 PM »
Wow, I'm really surprised how wonderfully needling worked for this condition!  Your sebaceous hyperplasia is gone!

 Thank you very much for your feedback. Let us know in the future whether you were a successful "Terminator" or whether the glands reappeared.

Worst case, you just needle them every time they reappear.